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“An Artist’s Response to Human Rights”: The MWHS Senior Art Collection

My+piece+is+the+representation+of+nationality.+The+girl+in+the+drawing+is+supposed+to+represent%0Amyself%2C+with+the+flags+stitched+together+to+represent+my+identity.+I+have+a+hispanic+background+and+I+have+always+been+proud+of+that%2C+but+sometimes+I+feel+like+I+do+not+belong+in+that+community.+I+am+a+second+generation+Argentine-Colombian%2C+but+I+have+never+been+to+these+countries%2C+my+Spanish+is+not+very+good%2C+and+I+barely+know+my+extended+family.+The+denied+stamp+represents+disapproval%2C+the+unacceptance+in+the+community.+The+15th+article+states+that+everyone+has+the+right+to+nationality+and+that+no+one+should+take+that+away+from+them%2C+but+how+can+I+feel+a+sense+of+belonging+when+it+always+felt+like+it+was+never+mine+to+begin+with.
No Pertenezco – Ava Morales
My piece is the representation of nationality. The girl in the drawing is supposed to represent myself, with the flags stitched together to represent my identity. I have a hispanic background and I have always been proud of that, but sometimes I feel like I do not belong in that community. I am a second generation Argentine-Colombian, but I have never been to these countries, my Spanish is not very good, and I barely know my extended family. The “denied” stamp represents disapproval, the unacceptance in the community. The 15th article states that everyone has the right to nationality and that no one should take that away from them, but how can I feel a sense of belonging when it always felt like it was never mine to begin with.

Walking into the library this past month, a collection of art immediately catches the eye. These artworks were created by 35 MWHS Senior Art Majors as part of a wider collection called “An Artist’s Response to Human Rights”.

Sponsored annually by the Orange County Human Rights Commission, high schools across the county are challenged to create artistic interpretations of the United Nations’ Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Each student chooses one of 30 articles to represent through mediums ranging from paint to pastel to sculpture, and students wrote a short explanation of their art’s connection to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

MWHS has participated in this event for over a decade. This year’s art was on display in SUNY Orange’s Orange Hall Gallery and the MWCSD Education Center alongside the library.

 

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About the Contributor
Olivia Cooper, Writer
Olivia Cooper is a writer for The Wire News and a junior at Monroe-Woodbury High School. After writing creatively for years, she joined in 2023 to explore a new avenue of writing and learn more about issues within the school. In her free time, she alternates between vegetable gardening, knitting with local wool, watching her pet corn snake, and playing rogue-like video games. She's excited to write on topics close to her heart for an audience of fellow students.