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Coxsackie virus spread among students in October

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Coxsackie virus spread among students in October

The Coxsackie virus viewed under an immunoelectron microscope.

The Coxsackie virus viewed under an immunoelectron microscope.

CDC Public Health Image

The Coxsackie virus viewed under an immunoelectron microscope.

CDC Public Health Image

CDC Public Health Image

The Coxsackie virus viewed under an immunoelectron microscope.

Colby Wright, Contributing Writer

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The Coxsackie virus is a highly contagious disease that impacted some of the high school students in the month of October. At least 12 students contracted the virus.

“Coxsackie virus infections occur most often in young children, usually during summer and fall,” according to the Mayo Clinic website. “There’s no specific treatment for Coxsackie virus infections… Doctors usually recommend rest, fluids, and over-the-counter pain relievers or fever reducers when appropriate.”

Common symptoms of the disease include blisters on the hand, foot, mouth, and throat. Other symptoms include a sore throat and fever. The disease spreads through the sores generated by the virus, and antibiotics are not effective in treating the virus.

“The disease can be transmitted through the sharing of food or liquids, so no sharing,” said Nurse Sassi. “Students and staff should also wash their hands multiple times per day.”

According to Nurse Sassi, the disease might have originated from summer sports teams, where close contact between players makes transmission easy.

Junior Peter Hagan was 12 when he had the disease. Hagan said that he had blisters all over his hand, and inside his mouth.

“I couldn’t eat anything,” said Hagan.

Another affected student who asked not to be named said that she broke out with sores in her mouth, and when she visited the doctor she was diagnosed with Coxsackie virus. She reported having aches and pain as the disease lasted approximately ten days. She took ibuprofen to ease the pain and stayed home until she was better to come to school again.

Despite these concerns, the Nurse Sassi said that Coxsackie virus was not especially prevalent.

“We didn’t have an enormous number [of cases],” said Nurse Sassi. “It’s not a problem any longer.”

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Coxsackie virus spread among students in October